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NEWS RELEASES - via EurekAlert!

Video games could dramatically streamline educational research

( Washington State University) A Washington State University professor has figured out a dramatically easier and more cost-effective way to do research on science curriculum in the classroom -- and it could include playing video games.Called 'computational modeling,' it involves a computer 'learning' student behavior and then 'thinking' as students would. Rich Lamb, who teaches science education at WSU's College of Education, said the process could revolutionize the way educational research is done.

Researchers develop unique waste cleanup for rural areas

( Washington State University) Washington State University researchers have developed a unique method to use microbes buried in pond sediment to power waste cleanup in rural areas. The first microbe-powered, self-sustaining wastewater treatment system could lead to an inexpensive and quick way to clean up waste from large farming operations and rural sewage treatment plants while reducing pollution.

Trial begins for MRI-compatible robot designed to improve accuracy of prostate biopsies

( Worcester Polytechnic Institute) A novel robot that can operate inside the bore of an MRI scanner is currently being tested as part of a biomedical research partnership program at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston with the aim of determining if the robot, in conjunction with real-time MRI images, can make prostate cancer biopsies faster, more accurate, less costly, and less discomforting. The system also has the potential to deliver prostate cancer therapies with greater precision.

Sensing neuronal activity with light

( California Institute of Technology) For years, neuroscientists have been trying to develop tools that would allow them to clearly view the brain's circuitry in action -- from the first moment a neuron fires to the resulting behavior in an organism. To get this complete picture, neuroscientists are working to develop a range of new tools to study the brain. Researchers at Caltech have developed one such tool that provides a new way of mapping neural networks in a living organism.

Agricultural fires in the Ukraine

( NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) Numerous fires -- marked with red dots -- are burning in Eastern Europe, likely as a result of regional agricultural practices.

NASA sees western edge of Tropical Storm Fung-Wong affecting Philippines

( NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) The NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP satellite saw the western edge of Tropical Storm Fung-Wong over the central Philippines on Sept. 18. Fung-Wong developed on Sept. 17 as Tropical Depression 16W, and strengthened into a tropical storm by 5 p.m. EDT on Sept. 17.

Electrical urban transport has arrived

( Elhuyar Fundazioa) Irizar presents the first electrical urban bus in Europe. Tecnalia, by means of 'eDrive Control' team, has actively participated in its development, and goes on collaborating with Irizar and Jema (Group Irizar) in the design of propulsion system and its power control units.

New Dartmouth smartphone app reveals users' mental health, performance, behavior

( Dartmouth College) Dartmouth researchers and their colleagues have built the first smartphone app that automatically reveals college students' mental health, academic performance and behavioral trends. In other words, your smartphone knows your state of mind -- even if you don't -- and how that affects you. The StudentLife app, which compares students' happiness, stress, depression and loneliness to their academic performance, also may be used in the general population -- for example, to monitor mental health, trigger intervention and improve productivity in workplace employees.

NASA marks Polo for a hurricane

( NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) Hurricane Polo still appears rounded in imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite, but forecasters at the National Hurricane Center expect that to change.

New high-resolution satellite image analysis: 5 of 6 Syrian World Heritage sites 'exhibit significant damage'

( American Association for the Advancement of Science) In war-torn Syria, five of six World Heritage sites now 'exhibit significant damage' and some structures have been 'reduced to rubble,' according to new high-resolution satellite image analysis by the nonprofit, nonpartisan American Association for the Advancement of Science.


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